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20140426
20140504
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CSPAN 33
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English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 6:00am EDT
and the future of relations between the u.s. and germany. this is 30 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. it is always a great pleasure to welcome my friend chancellor merkel to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned our businesses created 277,000 new jobs last month. all told, our business is now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for work and families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs and rebuilding america. i want to work with them wherever i can but i keep acting on my own whe
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 2:00am EDT
by the principle that europe, germany, and united states could not wish for a more reliable partner respectively than we have in the transatlantic alliance. the alliance is a prime importance to all of us and this is the basis for our very close economic cooperation as well. the transatlantic economic the whole 15ure on million jobs on that side of the atlantic. it is indispensable. german companies alone a great in more than 600,000 jobs over haveand american companies created 800,000 jobs as of now. the u.s. chamber of commerce is an eloquent testament to these very close integrations of our tool economic areas. the world has changed incredibly. you have more of a political and theomic weight of economies, the overall framework of the g 20. the global financial and economic crisis as greatly impaired progress and growth in the countries which has a lasting impact. globally, we see a tightening of growth which is something we are very pleased to. of imf is excepting growth 3.6% and next year to 3.9%. reason for usbe a to be complacent. in europe and the united states, just as other industrializ
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 12:00am EDT
, we can only be successful partnering with friends like germany. we will not succeed if we are doing that on our own. but i have pledged to chancellor merkel has been, in addition to the reforms we have already taken, in addition to saying we are going to apply privacy standards to how we deal with non-us persons as well as u.s. persons, in addition to the work we are doing to constrain the potential use of bulk data -- we are committed to a u.s.-german cyber dialogue to close further the gaps that may exist in terms of how we operate and how german intelligence operates to make sure there is transparency and clarity about we are doing and what our goals and intentions are. these are complicated issues and we are not perfectly aligned yet but we share the same values and we share the same concerns. this is something that is deeply important to me. i am absolutely committed by the time i leave this office, we will have a stronger legal footing and international framework for how we are doing business in the intelligence sphere. i will say that i don't think there is an inevitable cont
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 10:00pm EDT
with germany and the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. this is an hour. >> please welcome dr. angela merkel. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states. period is tom donohue am the president and ceo of the spine institution. i would like to extend a special welcome to those of you visiting our headquarters for the first time. the chamber is a 102-year-old organization. this building serves as a central rallying point for the ..s. business community we host several hundred meetings here in this room alone every year. room we are gathered in today, the international hall of flags, is rich in symbolism and history. afterom takes its name the overhead banners of 12 great explorers who blazed the first paths of trade. they planted the first seeds of commercial and industrial growth in the new world. these flags remind us that the transatlantic relationship has been around for a long time. today, we are reminded just how essential this relationship is. alliance is.-eu critical to global stability, peace, and freedom. this has been p
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 6:00pm EDT
in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the first time, and member of the polish governmen
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 4:00pm EDT
at the woodrow wilson center they hosted a discussion on ukraine with former diplomats from germany, russia, and poland. they also heard today from chuck hagel. margaret warner moderated the discussion. . harmon and secretary hagel iterated this morning, i would remind you we are here to look at really 20 years ago at this fateful decision was taken in january of 1994 which was at it to offer a partnership for peace to russia, warsaw pactwer states. any on this panel i will at thece in this panel, time, the czech republic and hungary were clamoring for an nato membership. this was a compromise suggested by the administration. beginning in 1997, nato started thosembership first to three countries, and today it is 12 countries among larger than it was, the 16 members at the time. this obviously sticks in president putin's craw. in his telethon, i do not know how many of you watched this, he talked about it repeatedly. he said we were promised after germany's unification, nato would not spread eastward. when we said why are you doing this, we hurt in response this does not concern you. nations
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 2:00pm EDT
sanctions against russia. germany ruthlessly pursued its mercantile interest and the lobbyist wrong. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including the former german chancellor. he is making money helping national gas -- natural gas flow. >> which goes to one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, correct? >> it is a rather blunt instrument. choice than tono try sanctions. politics are a flaw. ismany is what russia -- rubbish' partner. partner.ading what jacktell you lew had to say. >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the time crimeaussia went into since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial in russia'sn and -- weak economy. we see it in their exchange rate and stock exchange and a number of important economic indicators. they were downgraded to one notch above junk and with the rationale and the bond rating was in part the sanctions being imposed. the question is how do we proceed and occur -- a careful way step-by-step
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 12:00pm EDT
at the u.s. chamber of commerce and she will be focusing her comments on u.s. trade relations with germany. >> republic of germany. >> good morning, everybody. pleasure to a great welcome my friend, chancellor house. to the white germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. and with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief, comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunities for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned that our businesses created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told, our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to --ating good restriction good construction jobs rebuilding america. i want t
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 12:00pm EDT
quote with friends like germany. we will not succeed if we are
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 10:00am EDT
against russia clear in recent weeks. as a result, germany's position is unlikely to shift, barring a dramatic escalation of the conflict in ukraine. we will hear from chancellor merkel and president obama. in the meantime, a washington journal discussion this morning on the effectiveness of sanctions. host: our friday roundtable focusing on the issue of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, do they work? carla anne robbins is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. mark dubowitz of the foundation for democracy. "the wall street journal" the president meets with angela merkel. german companies opposing sanctions, can you explain. guest: german companies opposed sanctions against iran, it is no surprise they are opposing sanctions against russia. the german corporate lobby is very strong. it is no surprise. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sa
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 7:00am EDT
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 1:00am EDT
and 12th? >> at home until i was recalled. >> the operations center in germany. you were in the room. >> yes. >> you were able to see, hear, feel, understand what was going on in that room? >> we worked toward understanding, yes, sir. >> were you ever interviewed by the accountability review board? >> no, sir. >> your primary responsibility was to try -- "j two was focused on attribution, that attacks became a german will very soon after the event." what do you believe they were attributable to? >> an islamist extremist group. >> al qaeda? >> we felt it was ansaria. >> affiliated with al qaeda. >> yes. >> aqim, were they involved? >> aas is who we looked at. >> how quickly did you come to the conclusion that you believed there were al qaeda affiliates or al qaeda themselves involved engaged in the attack? >> very soon in the early hours of the activity. >> was it a video? >> no, sir. >> did it spark a protest? >> no, sir. >> i want to get the facts at a time. the cia station chief is quoted as saying, "not not an escalation a protest." would you agree or disagree with the cia station
CSPAN
May 1, 2014 1:00am EDT
will be gone, it meant when russian exports gas into the e.u., the first country of transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the unite
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2014 9:00pm EDT
exports gas into the eu, the first country of transit, let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries could not -- they could not dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do is a minute a gas comes and it is eu gas and can be transferred further. we talked about reversing the flows from poland to hungary from slovakia into ukraine. that would not have been possible in 2000 nine because of the regulatory structure that was in place. i working with europe to get the regulatory structure there, making some investments and getting them to make investments in infrastructure, they are less reliant today. as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe emma there is more we can do together to make sure that that reliance is diminished and quite significantly. fors it a pipe dream americans who see themselves in anything like the near future europeng natural gas to and would that have any effect on our domestic market or do we have so much that it would ,imply mean a new market trades reduction in the investments if we were able to
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2014 3:00am EDT
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they
CSPAN
Apr 29, 2014 7:00am EDT
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
CSPAN
Apr 28, 2014 12:00pm EDT
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
CSPAN
Apr 28, 2014 5:50am EDT
and germany. >> what do you think of germany? >> i like it. i have been there nine years and longest i lived anywhere. i consider germany my home in a weird way. and it's definitely a mind-opening experience for me and it's changed my perspective on a national level for the country and also on an international level as well. >> what's your favorite german word? >> oh, that's a good one. probably bergermeister. >> and the bill you want passed. >> i would go along the lines with everyone else, it seems an education bill. living in a military community i have seen the effects transferring through multiple school systems has on students and how the lack of standardization and common goals for education have on students and their futures. >> let's go back in the back here. people we have not been able to talk to. yes, sir. >> my name is daniel rose and i'm the delegate from tennessee. >> where in tennessee? >> memphis. >> the bill i would pass is definitely an immigration reform bill. just looking around the room and being able to talk to every single one of these delegates has been just an aspir
CSPAN
Apr 28, 2014 3:23am EDT
is bigger than france, it's bigger than russia. i am confident that we will defeat germany to $4 trillion. 16 million people work in it. seven out of the 10 smartest kids in the high school graduating class work and our health care system somewhere. so when people in washington bravely talk about reforming the health care system, the degrees of difficulty or its magnitude, this is way harder than iraq. is like invading a country the size of germany, and i think that's a little bit what is happening now. the main feature of this health economy for most of the last five years has been disinflation. frankly, something no one, including the futurists predicted, in 2009 our health system arrived at a rate of increase in health spending that we haven't seen in this country since dwight eisenhower was president of the united states. five years before medicare, and we stayed at that level of maybe 3.8, 3.9% increase in spending for five long years. the economists who believe this was a product of the recession will have trouble explaining why per capita medicare spending has trended down towards
CSPAN
Apr 27, 2014 3:05pm EDT
against holocaust denial. and i think, and germany has a kind of penance for what happened in that country. they have laws against holocaust denial and laws against espousing not see is him --naziism. you'll get the majority passing laws to oppress, using some reach laws, like in russia. >> speech laws were used in the ragtag nazi band, headed by someone named frank:, two march in skokie, illinois. the marshaling effect never occurred, for other reasons, but if it had it would have because of the strong first amendment opinion written by a judge who practiced what i call the rhetoric of regret. he kept saying -- this is awful, i hate it, it is going to do a lot of harm. i regret the fact that we have to allow these horrible things that happened, but there is the first amendment. always get this when i speak at universities and i agree when it comes to -- does someone who is espousing measuret denial views up to economic standards? of course not. that is force malarkey. but that is one of the reasons why, i think, when you pass laws that ban it you are actually going to encourage it. listen
CSPAN
Apr 27, 2014 11:10am EDT
in a displaced persons camp in germany soon after the end of world war ii. her family came to canada as refugees four years later. besides the distinguished legal credentials she has a degree from the royal conservatory of music in piano. justice abella. [applause] >> next the honorable dorit. she was president of the supreme court of israel. she served in the capacity for six years, the first woman in that position. she was recognized among many other things for her focus on protecting civil rights and human rights, women, and socially vulnerable immigrant workers and emphasized the importance of judicial review of activities of the executive branch of israel's government. her service as president of the supreme court followed 10 years as justice of that court. prior to this she served as a district attorney, director and deputy in the state attorney's office and as the state attorney of israel. the first woman in that position. she was born in tel aviv. justice dorit benish. [applause] >> and third, someone we know very well, the honorable ruth bader ginsberg, associate justice of the united s
CSPAN
Apr 27, 2014 12:35am EDT
it makes between jews in nazi germany and the current one percent. here in the bay area, tom's comments on income inequality feel particularly relevant given the current tensions ruling among san franciscans and what is known as the techie community. without any further introduction, please join me in welcoming tom perkins. [applause] i want to start at the very top which is to ask you what the catalyst was for your writing this short letter to the wall street journal. frustrations had been building up for along time about what i see as the demonization of the rich. it was particularly nasty attack triggeredife, which my response. i thought being a norwegian night i should write to her defense. i spilled a little more blood than i had planned, but i'm not sorry didn't. >> i should point out that your wife is in the front row of editorial this evening. you refer to an attack on her. explain. whose attack was at? spend a lot of time on this. over the years, the seven cisco francisco-- the san chronicle has had a series of attacks on her. , she'sof these attacks number one bestseller on ev
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 7:00pm EDT
germany is a little bit reticent to jump on board with some of these sanctions. they do get 40% of their national gas -- natural gas from russia. russian economies are not as integrated as the european and russian economies are. there are a lot of what -- we could have a lot of financial distress when our economies are not completely recovered from the last couple of years. >> according to the national council for behavioral health, 30% of active-duty and reserve no three personnel have mental health issues that require treatment. there was an initiative this week aimed at responding early to mental illness. this is about one hour. >> everyone has a seat. let me say thank you for being with us. i'm thrilled to have so many of you that have served our country. spouses, sisters, children that have served our country. i am the president and ceo of the council for behavioral health. i was thinking about the fact that we are in the press club and how appropriate that is. we are going to be talking about have protected the first amendment. i am very grateful that we are here. i have
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 4:35pm EDT
the transition, we would have live telecasts with our colleagues in germany. and our colleagues in australia. we would have all the engineers come in and we would sit down and have -- it was a multihour. one of the things i wanted to do so that when any other country goes through the transition, they would have the opportunity to go in and use our libraries. i don't know if that ever ended up happening. the other example i want to give is brazil. president bush was really close to the president of brazil so we went down, the education secretary went down to work together. they had been collecting money for their universal services for many years. we went down to talk about some of the good parts of her u.s. not so goodthe parts that we would encourage them to do something i could not agree more. here being so criticized to get out and happy all say "you are the gold standard, it was unbelievable. it is so true. right.n reilly is so the u.s. policies have such an incredible impact. spectrum auctions are now starting to occur. the wireless auctions and licenses that other countries that used to be
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 2:19pm EDT
of the interesting experiences you had is you were in east germany so you became familiar with the horrors of the official propaganda system. the stasi and so forth. you understand the need of information for a free society been in the have not unlike snowden, you are a contractor but then you rose to a high official position. surely, living in washington, as you do, you are probably aware. we had lunch today. i remember when i was reporting for "the l.a. times and the development of a star wars system, i think it just goes to the point i was on tsa or a southwest airlines, a plane going from l.a. to san jose but and edward teller -- maybe not known to all of our students, but he was the father behind the instrumentals very in getting ronald reagan to support star wars. they were going to have an x-ray laser. he said, where you going and i said i am going to the stanford arms-control program. he said make sure sid tells you about the great results we had on the cottage test. we got lazing. true, that would be the biggest change in the military balance. it was the thing that any enemy would
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 7:00am EDT
quickly. you see some of the european economies are very tied to guest problems. germany has a pipeline underneath the baltics to connect directly to russia. i think that is one of the reasons you will see germany they do getnt -- their money from -- 40% of their gas from russia. the u.s. and russian economy is not nearly as integrated. there is certainly a love for he that it can cause us and european allies a lot of .inancial distress host: are we developing the infrastructure -- guest: i believe there are five or six lng terminal points. only one of those in louisiana is currently under construction. we are a long ways out from making the u.s. export industry to where we can help our allies in europe. opened a have recently liquefied terminal. we are equal to get fish eager get ---- we are eager to a lot of them are buying gas from russians. all of these countries are coming to us and saying, look, we are interested in buying energy resources but the problem is we are at least 10 years out from being able to fulfill the requests. host: we are talking with hannah thoburn from the fore
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 3:00am EDT
the league vie -- after verdict >> versai will les, by allowing kreup reparations against germany, the country that succeeded in being the guarantor of the global system after the war, underwriting the world bank, the integration.obal if you look at its distressing fatigue with the world, most demonstrate bid a to support aternational organizations, disstressing difficulty in consensus political for trade agreements that integration, a failure indo what's self evidently the interest of american workers support the xm banks, see, to,there for you, a failure a concern and a desire to ramp back military spending in a our potential adversaries military spending is rapidly. a reluctance to become embroiled in foreign challenges because they are too hard. ultimately, whether we will judged by history to have won the piece after the cold war, as we did after the second world war is in more today than would have seemed likely five or 10 years ago. the conventional security challenges, the conventional economic integration challenges that i've talked about. it's also the challenge of and g
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)